Sunday, 15 November 2020

Everything you ever wanted to know about Change Management

Adapt Consulting Change Management PDF.pdf
ADAPT CONSULTING - DRAFT - NOT FOR CIRCULATION +44(0)7797762051

A MINI COMPENDIUM OF CHANGE MANAGEMENT BY ADAPT CONSULTING

Introduction

There are lots of models for change management out there. Here are some of the ones I have used together with some details of how I have applied them, and some links to further reading. There is so much information on the internet that it is simply foolish to think that I can add value beyond what is already available so the purpose is provide a mini compendium, some comments and some links and you can fod out more for yourself.

Section 1 Kotter's 8-Step Process for Leading Change

Section 2 Kübler-Ross Change Curve

Section 3 The Change House

Section 4 William Bridges' Transitions Model

Section 5 Beckhard-Harris Change Equation

Section 6 The ADKAR Model

Section 7 Kurt Lerwin Unfreeze, Change, Freeze Model

Section 8 McKinsey 7s Model

Section 9 Cultural Web

Section 10 Table: Components of change

If this mini compendium of change managements is useful or you would like similar mini compendium on the following please get in touch. These are all elements from my Projects and Change Academy Workshops and I am happy to share these common resources.

  • Communications Planning
  • Stakeholder Management
  • Teams Management
  • Indicators and Metrics for Manageing Performance and Change
  • Creating a Safety net for Successful Change

ABOUT TIM ROGERS

I am an experienced Management Consultant, Project and Change Manager. I am qualified with an MBA, various PostGrads in Technology, Finance and Compliance; I am also a Prince2 Project Manager, APMG Change Practitioner, Trainer, Facilitator and Coach; I am a tutor/mentor for the Chartered Management Institute; I am a former Independant Non Exec of the Public Accounts Committee.

My roles and responsibilities have included The Tranformation of Jerseys Harbours and Airport (from public sector department to private company); Review of governance in Health and Social Services; Set-up of Programme Office, Projects tools, templates and training for CI Cooperative; Operations Change and Sales Support for NatWest and RBSI; An USD 20million acquisition programme for a Cloud Services business.

If you are interested in Strategy, Projects, Programmes or Change please contact Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.com or phone +44(0)7797762051


The 8-Step Process for Leading Change

This is perhaps the most widely known model for tackling change in an easy step-by-step approach. I will not go into great detail on the model because there are Reading References or Resources below which fully describe each step. The point here is just to provide a graphic (above) the summary (below) and some real-life practical observations.
  • 1. Create a Sense of Urgency
  • 2. Form a Guiding Coalition
  • 3. Develop an Inspired Vision
  • 4. Convey the New Vision
  • 5. Empower Others to Enact the Vision
  • 6. Generate Short-Term Wins
  • 7. Sustain Acceleration of the Vision
  • 8. Institute Permanent Change

What is good about this

We all like simple step-by-step instructions and just like a recipe it promised a perfect result provided you have all the ingredients, the right environment and the right utensils and people. It is well understood by many and therefore creates a common language with lots of people able and willing to offer input and advice.

What is bad about this

It is simplistic and formulaic and each step is more easily said than done. For example: Sustain Acceleration of the Vision, how many ways can that we interpreted and implemented? The truth is that organisations are as different an varied as the people in them and whilst we can make generalisations about change that doesn't actually help us deliver it any more than understanding the shape of a house can make us either an architect or a builder.

My experience

A lot of management consultants will hand out simple books like "Our Iceberg Is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions" as if to say "Look it's easy." But beware the do-it-yourself approach to change may be appealing but some things (like riding a bicycle or playing the violin) are best learned by experience rather than reading a book. As Red Adair once said "If you think its expensive hiring a professional, try using an amateur"

However the advantage of the model, and the book, is that it is a conversation starter. It gets people thinking, and whilst the best approach for any organisation will depend upon context and resources, the model does help people understanding some of the key elements of change, and that it is a process that needs to be orchestrated, even if in reality it is not as simple and sequential as the model suggests.

I have used the book Our Iceberg Is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions because it is a cheap hand-out to senior managers and staff and a great primer for the journey ahead. I do not believe for one moment that change happens in such a formulaic way but like all models it is not about whether it is true, it is about whether it is useful.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://www.kotterinc.com/8-steps-process-for-leading-change/

https://www.accipio.com/eleadership/mod/wiki/view.php?pageid=136

https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newPPM_82.htm

https://www.businessballs.com/change-management/8-step-change-model-kotter/

https://www.amazon.com/Our-Iceberg-Melting-Succeeding-Conditions/dp/0399563911

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

Kübler-Ross Change Curve

This is perhaps the most widely known model for understanding the people impact of change. I will not go into great detail on the model because there are Reading References or Resources below which fully describe each step. The point here is just to provide a graphic (above) the summary (below) and some real-life practical observations.
  • Denial – The first reaction is denial.
  • Anger – When the individual recognizes that denial cannot continue, they become frustrated, especially at proximate individuals.
  • Bargaining – The third stage involves the hope that the individual can avoid a cause of grief.
  • Depression – "I'm so sad, why bother with anything?"
  • During the fourth stage, the individual despairs
  • Acceptance – "It's going to be okay."

There are hundreds of variations on this model, which was originally about grief rather than organisational change.

What is good about this

The model is useful to help people understand people's possible reactions to change, both in terms of emotion and behaviour ostensibly helping organisations understand resistance to change. It can be used to plan communications and anticipate interventions for support at each critical phase/stage.

What is bad about this

Not all organisational change is like grief! And not all emotions follow a rational and systematic approach which can be anticipated like the arrival of a train.

My experience

I have used this to plan interventions and support at each critical phase/stage and create a communications calendar to time what gets said when, by whom, to whom in order to help them with that exact phase/stage that they are experiencing. Note that people wil have different experiences and may be at a different phase/stage in the journey.

One key factor is that change does not happen all at once and I have used a version of the curve with a train following the curve and pulling along many carriages. The point is, like a roller coaster, at any stage the people at the front will have a different experience from those at the back with result that some may be experiencing an uphill struggle just as others are cresting the top for a downhill plunge. This was used a lot when devising stakeholder plans comprising a communications calendar and discrete and different interventions for each "carriage" in our train.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://www.ekrfoundation.org/5-stages-of-grief/change-curve/

https://www.cleverism.com/understanding-kubler-ross-change-curve/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_stages_of_grief

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

Change House

This is perhaps less widely known than than the previous models but was the one used throughout my project when "incorporating" elements of the public sector (Example: Transforming the Harbours and Airport from Public Sector to Private Company). This is in some ways similar to the Kübler-Ross Change Curve, but it is not about greif and it does not assume we have the same starting and end-point in our journey. Indeed it explores where people are and where they could be indicating a possible move in any direction , noting that at any time different people, teams, departments or mindsets may be in different rooms with different perspectives.

  • Room of Contentment
  • Room of Denial
  • Room of Confusion
  • Room of Renewal
In some versions add
  • Dungeon of Dispair
  • Pit of Paralysis
  • Wrong Door

What is good about this

The model is useful to help people understand people's possible reactions to change, both in terms of emotion and behaviour ostensibly helping organisations understand resistance to change. It can be used to plan communications and anticipate interventions for support at each critical phase/stage.

What is bad about this

Not all organisational change is like grief! And not all emotions follow a rational and systematic approach which can be anticipated like the arrival of a train.

My experience

I have used this to plan interventions and support at each critical phase/stage and create a communications calendar to time what gets said when, by whom, to whom in order to help them with that exact phase/stage that they are experiencing. Note that people wil have different experiences and may be at a different phase/stage in the journey.

One key factor is that change does not happen all at once and I have used a version of the curve with a train following the curve and pulling along many carriages. The point is, like a roller coaster, at any stage the people at the front will have a different experience from those at the back with result that some may be experiencing an uphill struggle just as others are cresting the top for a downhill plunge. This was used a lot when devising stakeholder plans comprising a communications calendar and discrete and different interventions for each "carriage" in our train.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://info.thevirtualtrainingteam.co.uk/blog/the-change-house-which-room-are-you-in

https://www.skillpacks.com/house-of-change-3/

https://challengingcoaching.co.uk/the-change-house-how-to-avoid-complacency-denial-and-confusion/

https://pharmafield.co.uk/in_depth/four-rooms-of-change-managing-transition/

https://www.fatrank.com/the-change-house-model-get-on-the-foooking-roof/

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

Bridges Transition Model

William Bridges (1933 – February 17, 2013) was an American author, speaker, and organizational consultant. He emphasized the importance of understanding transitions as a key for organizations to succeed in making changes. He says transition is the psychological process of adapting to change. Transition consists of three phases: letting go of the past, the "neutral zone" where the past is gone but the new isn't fully present, and making the new beginning

  • Stage 1: Ending, Losing & Letting Go
    • Fear.
    • Denial.
    • Anger.
    • Sadness.
    • Disorientation.
    • Frustration.
    • Uncertainty.
    • A sense of loss.
  • Stage 2: The Neutral Zone
    • Resentment towards the change initiative.
    • Low morale and low productivity.
    • Anxiety about their role, status or identity.
    • Skepticism about the change initiative.
  • Stage 3: The New Beginning
    • High energy.
    • Openness to learning.
    • Renewed commitment to the group or their role.
There are similarities with the Kübler-Ross Change Curve in terms of emotions and with The 8-Step Process for Leading Change as regards steps for change.

What is good about this

This has many of the virtues of similar models mentioned elsewhere in this document.

What is bad about this

Not all organisational change is a 3 step process!

My experience

I have used this when planning major projects to recognise the need to celebrate the past before embarking on the path to the future. Too often leaders denigrate or criticise the past in favour of a better future. To do so risks undermining and alienating the people, process, products and past history. You cn build a better future without rubbishing the past.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://wmbridges.com/about/what-is-transition/

https://careervision.org/transitions-weathering-storms-change-2/

https://cio-wiki.org/wiki/William_Bridges%E2%80%99_Transition_Model

https://worldofwork.io/2019/07/bridges-transition-model-for-change/

https://www.toolshero.com/change-management/bridges-transition-model/

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

Beckhard-Harris Change Equation

The model rests on the assumption that organisations or individuals only change when:
  • Dissatisfaction: there is dissatisfaction when there is a situation that people want to change;
  • Vision: people share a reasonably clear vision of a future situation that is both better and achievable;
  • First steps: the action plan to achieve the vision is acceptable and sets out the first steps to be taken;
  • Resistance: the combined strength of the three factors above is greater than the existing resistance to change.

The Beckhard-Harris Change Equation aims to serve as a simplified way of analysing the potential success or failure of a change initiative within the workplace. If effectively describes the situation which is required for the desired change initiative to be successful.

The original “Formula for Change” was described by then-management consultant David Gleicher in the 1960s, but was sculpted into the modern change equation during the 1980s by organisational theorists Richard Beckhard and Reuben T. Harris, from whom this particular model derives its name. It was then further simplified and popularised in the late 1980s and early 1990s by experienced mentor Kathie Dannemiller.

What is good about this

Beckhard-Harris Change Equation is good because it does suggest why projects might fail, and this is useful since so many people naively believe it is as simple as applying some of the steps outlined elsewhere in this document.

What is bad about this

Formulas are a bit simplistic. If Change Management were an exact science then a consistent approach would be rewarded by consistent outcomes and success can be assured. Sadly life is not that simple when it comes to change.

My experience

I have used this to indicate to senior management why there is resistance to change: In most cases the compelling reason for change simply is not that compelling and the effort and cost is not worth the reward. In some cases this means a re-think of the project in others a re-think of the data and communications to better state the compelling reason.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://www.businessballs.com/change-management/formula-for-change/

http://pastatenaacp.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Beckhard-Harris-Change-Model-DVF.pdf

https://www.humanperf.com/en/blog/nowiunderstand-glossary/articles/beckhard-harris-formula-for-change

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

The ADKAR Model

The ADKAR model outlines the five building blocks to achieve successful change management:
  • Awareness - Employees must be made aware of the need for change.
  • Desire - Employees must have the desire to participate and fully support the change.
  • Knowledge - By gathering knowledge about the change process the (ultimate) goal of the change will become clear for the employees.
  • Ability - Because of the ability to learn new skills and by managing behaviour, change is accepted.
  • Reinforcement - Reinforcement to sustain the change makes it clear for all employees that there is no turning back.

As any manager knows, leading people through change can be frustrating. You know you’ve found a better way to do things, but people often push back against the change, or quietly slip back into their old way of working as soon as you relax your vigilance. The ADKAR model is a 5-step framework that helps deal with the people-aspect of change management. The methodology was developed by Jeffery Hiatt, a best-selling author and the founder of Prosci.

What is good about this

All the time in projects and change management I talk about the competence, capacity, drive and desire of people and how important these pre-requisite are to successful change. The ADKAR Model covers this well. I can see links to Robert Dilts [I can do that here] model and think this is a critical element.

What is bad about this

Creating competence, capacity, drive and desire of people is more complicated than a task list and demands listening, even coaching, of people prior to equipping them for the change journey. Somebody does not become a carpenter simply by having some tools and a book, not a chef by having recipes and ingredients. There is more to this (and the other models) than the lists suggest.

My experience

I have not actively used the ADKAR Model in my change projects, but you can see it is similar to all the other models I have used.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://academy.whatfix.com/adkar-model-what-is-it-and-how-to-use-it/

https://www.howspace.com/resources/how-to-take-the-adkar-model-from-theory-to-practice

https://expertprogrammanagement.com/2018/02/adkar-model-of-change/

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

Kurt Lerwin Unfreeze, Change, Freeze Model

  • Unfreezing
  • Changing
  • Freezing (or Refreezing)

Sound similar to the Bridges Transition Model? I think so.

Lewin is often recognized as the "founder of social psychology" and was one of the first to study group dynamics and organizational development. Alongside Lewin’s change management model, you’ll notice similarities with methodologies like the Prosci ADKAR model, Kotter’s theory, The McKinsey 7-S model, and others.

One of the major steps that you’ll undertake in the first stage of Lewin’s three-stage model is to go through a Force Field Analysis. Lewin once stated in the publication, Resolving Social Conflicts and Field Theory in Social Science, “To bring about any change, the balance between the forces which maintain the social self-regulation at a given level has to be upset.” This is a basic tenant of Lewin’s 3 stage model of change, that the force to resist change needs to be broken up in order for the positive force driving change to win the day. Prior to the change, you can imagine the force field – or balance of the two forces – to be at equilibrium. Everyone is doing what they always do because the change hasn’t been introduced yet.

Does Force Field Analysis (effort forward being met with resistance back) sound similar to the Beckhard-Harris Change Equation? I think so.

What is good about this

This model may seem simple, but it is clearly a model that has triggered thinking and development of newer models like ADKAR model, Bridges Transition Model etc., and so should be noted and respected even if the newer models are more popular.

What is bad about this

The simple idea of Unfreeze, Change, Freeze like people and processes can be thawed and then refrozen is very dated. Note that most change models nowadays do not suggest Refreezing but embrace the idea of continual on-going change and there is no real consolidation and 'we are finished' step.

My experience

I absolutely have used Resolving Social Conflicts and Field Theory ideas in union negotiations as part of change programme. Here instead of using force against force [force to resist change needs to be broken up in order for the positive force driving change to win the day] we looked to see how we could make consessions and accomodate concerns whist still delivering our goals.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://www.change-management-coach.com/kurt_lewin.html

https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newPPM_94.htm

https://onlinepmcourses.com/kurt-lewins-freeze-phases/

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Kurt-Lewins-change-management-model_fig2_330315840

http://changingminds.org/disciplines/change_management/lewin_change/lewin_change.htm

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

McKinsey 7s Model

  • Structure - Structure is the way in which a company is organized – chain of command and accountability relationships that form its organizational chart.
  • Strategy - Strategy refers to a well-curated business plan that allows the company to formulate a plan of action to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage, reinforced by the company’s mission and values.
  • Systems - Systems entail the business and technical infrastructure of the company that establishes workflows and the chain of decision-making.
  • Skills - Skills form the capabilities and competencies of a company that enables its employees to achieve its objectives.
  • Style - The attitude of senior employees in a company establishes a code of conduct through their ways of interactions and symbolic decision-making, which forms the management style of its leaders.
  • Staff - Staff involves talent management and all human resources related to company decisions, such as training, recruiting, and rewards systems
  • Shared Values - The mission, objectives, and values form the foundation of every organization and play an important role in aligning all key elements to maintain an effective organizational design.

The focus of the McKinsey 7s Model lies in the interconnectedness of the elements that are categorized by “Soft Ss” and “Hard Ss” – implying that a domino effect exists when changing one element in order to maintain an effective balance. Placing “Shared Values” as the “center” reflects the crucial nature of the impact of changes in founder values on all other elements.

The interdependency of this strategy development framework means that if one element changes, you will have to address the other six elements to analyze how the change affects them and to determine how each may need to change to keep organizational goals aligned.

Business uses of the McKinsey framework include:

  • Determining how your business will achieve targets and goals
  • Boosting productivity and performance
  • Putting a proposed strategy into effect
  • Facilitating the complexities of aligning departments and processes during mergers or acquisitions
  • Examining the effects of organizational changes within the company
  • Implementing policies to improve employee skills and competency

The 7s model can be used when organizational design and effectiveness are at question. It can help all stakeholders to work towards agreement when there are differing opinions about how the seven elements should be aligned.

What is good about this

Simple and comprehensive, easy to lear and communicate and excellent headings / structure for any report.

What is bad about this

I think the soft-elements are a little weak and prefer the cultural web

My experience

This is my go-to starting point for structural or organisational change. For cultural change I use the cultural web as my starting point.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/strategy/mckinsey-7s-model/

https://www.lucidchart.com/blog/mckinsey-7s-model

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/enduring-ideas-the-7-s-framework

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

CULTURAL WEB

  • Stories and Myths
    • What form of company reputation is communicated between customers and stakeholders?
    • What stories do people tell new employees about the company?
    • What do people know about the history of the organisation?
    • What do these stories say about the culture of the business?
  • Rituals and Routines
    • What do employees expect when they arrive each day?
    • What experience do customers expect from the organisation?
    • What would be obvious if it were removed from routines?
    • What do these rituals and routines say about organisational beliefs?
  • Symbols
    • What kind of image is associated with the company from the outside?
    • How do employees and managers view the organisation?
    • Are there any company-specific designs or jargon used?
    • How does the organisation advertise itself?
  • Control Systems
    • Which processes are strongly and weakly controlled?
    • In general, is the company loosely or tightly controlled?
    • Are employees rewarded or punished for performance?
    • What reports and processes are used to keep control of finance, etc?
  • Organisation Structures
    • How hierarchical is the organisation?
    • Is responsibility and influence distributed in a formal or informal way?
    • Where are the official lines of authority?
    • Are there any unofficial lines of authority?
  • Power Structures
    • Who holds the power within the organisation?
    • Who makes decisions on behalf of the company?
    • What are the beliefs and culture of those as the top of the business?
    • How is power used within the organisation?

The Cultural Web is a tool used to map the culture of an organisation and is a way of seeing and understating the different influences that affect organisational. culture. It can be used to map existing culture and it can also used to map future.

What is good about this

This, in my opinion, is the best cultural diagnosis toolkit that there is. Am I sitting on the fence too much?

What is bad about this

I find it excellent as a diagnosis toolkit, but it is not a solution, goal, objective. It tells you the symptoms but not the cure, it shows you the misalignment but the realignment is generally through structural or process change which then create a new environment in which culture evolves. You cannot simply impose a culture, and if it were simple to impose a culture then in reality a new culture might be imposed each day!

My experience

I love this and regularly used this whenever I arrive at a client site to assess the culture and the realised strategy by looking at what people do, how they behave etc., ahead of reading the written-down strategy. It is always revealing.

Further Reading References or Resources

https://www.leadershipcentre.org.uk/artofchangemaking/theory/cultural-web/

https://www.businessballs.com/strategy-innovation/cultural-web-johnson-scholes/

http://leadershipforchange.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Cultural-Web-Questions.pdf

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

Table: alignment of change components

The origins of this model are unclear but I’ve been aware of it since the mid-1980s. Sometimes I use it with a fifth element: “Reinforcement and Recognition”. I have seen the model attributed to Henley Management School but they may simply be users of it and there is a strong parallel between the 5-box version and the ADKAR model.

There are different versions around the theme, some with more or less elements

This is probably my favorite

  • Confusion (lacking vision) Solution: Step up and lead! Dig deep and find something you and your team will live for, and possibly something to die for.
  • Anxiety (lacking skills) Solution: Either hire or acquire the skill sets or invest in training for you and your staff.
  • Gradual Change (lacking incentive) Solution: Find a way to make the vision real to those who will carry it out. Empower your people to be something more than they are.
  • Frustration (lacking resources) Solution: Get your resource management right. Attract and retain the right staff, get your accounts receivable in order, define your procurement processes.
  • False Starts (lacking an action plan)

What is good about this

Simple, effective, common sense. Sometimes it is useful to have a tool that can be used to recognise failure and diagnose the cause.

What is bad about this

It is more of a diagnostic tool than a formular for change.

My experience

I often use this to explain why projects or change isn't working. Its simple grid allows people to quickly see if the problem is people, process, accountability, ownership etc. You can tailor this to the departments or other elements of a project or change programme to help identify the "sticky wheel".

Further Reading References or Resources

https://us7.campaign-archive.com/?u=899c4bb85a1ab7e87566517f9&id=899a3bebd8

https://slideplayer.com/ACTIONABLE+FIRST+STEPS+SUCCESSFUL

There are hundreds more... if you find a particularly good resource let me know! Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.Com

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

THIS IS WHAT SOME OF OUR CUSTOMERS HAVE SAID...

  • Chief Officer, Economic Development to Scrutiny Panel Sept 2013 - Those 9 work streams are working alongside each other, but it is being worked under a signal project management structure and the incorporation project board meets once a month at least to review how all of that progress is doing and how it is all knitting together because there are dependencies that flow through those projects. So this has been managed as close to a big project, project management discipline as I have ever seen here. It has been … this is what I would call a proper job in terms of project management. I think it will set a standard for the management to do some of the more complex projects right across Government. There are people at the top of it that are doing it who have pure project management expertise. It does not matter for them whether they are project managing building an incinerator, the new hospital or whatever, it is discipline that we have brought to bear on this project, because it is so complicated.
  • Chief Officer, to Chief Minister and Political Oversight Group - Tim Rogers completed the Incorporation Programme post implementation review, and attached is the final report closing down the project. The report demonstrates the project complexity, delivered and under budget, and huge success in achieving Incorporation of the Ports, something that many felt was unachievable when we started this journey.
  • Tim Rogers (Adapt Consulting) is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable business partner. He is able to distil complex matters into simple tasks. He is practical with advice and responsive to business needs with a clear focus on helping achieve the businesses objectives.
  • From the outset Tim's style, manner and pragmatic approach distinguished him from other consultants. For one, he was deeply knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the topic and we had a real sense of being supported by someone with a clear focus on achieving our objectives. Tim was happy to adopt our chosen preference for one to one engagement and desire to address the detail of the practical implications. He was able to distil complex matters into readily understandable actions. Our lasting impression of Tim's work with us is one of ease of communication, total commitment and a reassuring knowledge of the subject matter.
  • I think yesterday went very well – in fact I think it is the best we have spent for a while. The reason I say this is because you have given us some very practical pointers which we feel is relevant to our business – others have simply bamboozled us with high tech tools and tried to scare us into purchasing them
If you are interested in Strategy, Projects, Programmes or Change then get in contact. We love what we do and we would enjoy sharing ideas, insights, even casestudies, and talking about your programme and what might work best for you.

CONTACT

If you are interested in Strategy, Projects, Programmes or Change please contact Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.com or phone +44(0)7797762051


Tim HJ Rogers MBA CITP
CONSULTANT MENTOR COACH
Mob 447797762051
Tim@AdaptConsultingCompany.com


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